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The Etrian Odyssey Origins Collection Preserves The Uniqueness Of The Games

First-person dungeon crawlers aren’t that rare. From games like sorcery sets the stage for them, we have seen many one-off hits and series. But there’s always been something special about Etrian Odyssey. Atlus purposefully set out to pose incredible challenges, while also giving people the opportunity to be meticulous in their map creation. That’s not even getting into the endgame revelations about the nature of the world of tickets. These are special titles and while there will always be something special about playing Etrian Odyssey I, II, and third on the nintendo ds, Etrian Odyssey Origins Collection it shows that the series can maintain its individuality and thrive even on Switch and PC.

Each Etrian Odyssey game in Etrian Odyssey Origins Collection it starts similarly. Players are newcomers to a city that is also home to some kind of mysterious dungeon. Adventurers form guilds and venture into these labyrinths in search of knowledge, glory, and monetary rewards. You can only take five people into a dungeon with you on each trip, but 30 members can be registered in your guild each drop. Because each installment is set in different cities, this influences classes, dungeon items, and even surrounding areas due to different biomes. So, in the original game, you explore Etria’s Yggdrasil Labyrinth with the Alchemist, Dark Hunter, Landsknecht, Medic, Protector, Survivor, and Minstrel. In Ethrian Odyssey IIyou go to High Lagaard and Gunner and War Magus join the party. Etrian Odyssey III sends you to Armorroad and the seas that surround it with the new Arbalist, Buccaneer, Farmer, Gladiator, Hoplite, Monk, Ninja, Sovereign, Wildling, and Zodiac classes. (Each game also features between one and two unlockable classes.)

Review: Etrian Odyssey Origins Collection preserves the individuality of the series

Image via Atlus

Success comes from developing a sense of routine. Each dungeon floor is a blank slate for your party to map. You get various tools to do this via buttons or the touch screen on the Switch versions of all games on Etrian Odyssey Origins Collection. Enemies spawn randomly, and an encounter is most likely to occur when an indicator turns red on the screen, resulting in a turn-based fight against an enemy. Once hit, they drop pieces, which you then sell to gain access to new equipment and items and earn money. (Similarly, materials can be found in gathering plots where you slash, mine, or take, as long as a character invests in that ability.) The money you earn is reinvested in weapons and armor to ensure your survival as you delve deeper into the dungeons.

Experience gained from leveling up makes you stronger, while also unlocking skill points that you place in trees for each character’s class to determine their build. However, these skill trees get incredibly complex, especially in Etrian Odyssey III. If you create a wizard-like character, such as an alchemist or zodiac, they’ll probably focus primarily on one type of magic and introduce a second type as a backup option. A Dark Hunter could focus on swords or whips as a weapon, which then determines whether they get status effect abilities tied to sword attacks or whip lashes. A good starting group would include a tank-like character such as a Protector or Gladiator, a healer such as a Medic or Sovereign, an Alchemist or Zodiac wizard, a melee damage dealer, and someone who can inflict damage ailments. state or ties. But as you progress through certain floors or take on particular bosses or FOEs, you may need specialized groups that include more people who can link limbs together to block specific attacks or a dedicated supporter for buffs.

Review: Etrian Odyssey Origins Collection preserves the individuality of the series

Image via Atlus

In general, your goal is always to get deeper into the dungeon. However, the government of each city in the game will offer official missions. (These tend to involve fighting specific bosses.) There are also side quests you can take on at the local tavern, which might involve going to specific locations in the dungeon that you may have already marked as suspicious, or finding certain monster materials. The latter of which can be tricky, as it might involve defeating a monster in a certain way. I also like to make defeating the FSOs a priority, as a point of pride. These are the signature opponents that appear as marked monsters on the map, are much stronger than the standard enemies on the ground, and can essentially feel like more complicated boss-level opponents scattered throughout areas. Being powerful enough to take on one even if he decides to get into a fight you’re finishing with some common opponents.

Overall, it feels great to be back in all three of these games. Etrian Odyssey I, II, and third look fantastic on the Switch. The multiple default control schemes also mean it’s easy to find one that’s comfortable for the person playing the game. The new character portraits are mostly fine, though I found I took more advantage of the DLC images of people from previous Atlus games that appear as a bonus. The remastered NPC character and monster art looks really cool, and the newly designed character portraits for the classes fit well with them.

Image via Atlus

Image via Atlus

But what really surprised and impressed me about Etrian Odyssey Origins Collection it’s how well it handles the series’ signature mapping. Yo loved making maps in the DS and 3DS deliveries. It’s my favorite part of those games. I enjoyed it even more than the turn-based RPG fighting and character customization, though those elements are pretty strong in every entry. But being able to draw walls, leave notes to yourself, highlight certain items, and apply appropriate icons is a lot of fun. I was concerned about touch screen switch controls for Etrian Odyssey Origins Collection would be missing To my surprise, using the actual buttons is my favorite part. I play with full automapping turned on, to take care of more tedious tasks like drawing walls and painting floors. But I really appreciate how easy it is to press a button to bring up the mapping menu, which essentially splits the screen in half and is a great way to play solo, and then use the directional and trigger buttons to place icons and notation feels. Perfect and I am a convert to the new control scheme.

Etrian Odyssey Origins Collection also features more accessible versions of Etrian Odyssey I, II, and third on the switch. All three entrances offer the Picnic difficulty option, which makes the experience much easier and also allows you to use a single Ariadne Thread multiple times to get out of the dungeon to the safety of the city. Combine that with the “full” automatic mapping option, and anyone who has ever been curious about the series can fearlessly venture into any dungeon. Especially since the auto save option can also be enabled and disabled, and it has multiple save slots. But what I also loved about the presence of this is that at any moment, someone can adjust the difficulty. So someone who is getting used to exploring could move up to Basic if they prefer a more traditional experience. Someone familiar with the games, but wary of Expert, could play with it after fully mapping out a floor to see how they would handle it. He’s incredibly open, with no penalties for pushing his limits or folding to a more lenient option.

Image via Atlus

Image via Atlus

He Etrian Odyssey games have always been a triumph, and Etrian Odyssey Origins Collection it’s the kind of loving proof-of-concept to convince Switch and PC owners that yes, it’s still just as good on a platform that doesn’t boast two screens. Etrian Odyssey I, II, and third continue to be fantastic, challenging and engaging games that will push players to explore. Even better is that the automatic mapping and difficulty options increase the ease of entry, making them even more attractive. It’s wonderful to see all three games again, and I hope this is a precursor to a seventh installment.

Etrian Odyssey Origins Collection is available on Nintendo Switch and PC.