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Ousted Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s next job is to teach a LEADERSHIP course at Harvard

The embattled former Chicago mayor, who lost her re-election bid last month after serving just one term, will teach leadership at Harvard.

Lori Lightfoot, 60, presided over four years dominated by rising crime, war with teachers’ unions and police, and battles with the City Council. She resigned May 15 as the first mayor not to secure a second term in 40 years.

However, on Thursday, the Harvard Chan School of Public Health announced that Lightfoot would join its faculty for a semester in the fall.

Michelle Williams, the dean, praised Lightfoot for her “strong leadership in advocating for the health, equity and dignity of all Chicagoans.”

Lori Lightfoot is seen last month on her last day in office as Chicago mayor.  She was the first mayor in 40 years not to be re-elected.

Lori Lightfoot is seen last month on her last day in office as Chicago mayor. She was the first mayor in 40 years not to be re-elected.

Lightfoot will teach at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health in the fall for one semester

Lightfoot will teach at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health in the fall for one semester

Williams praised “his declaration of structural racism as a public health crisis” and his “innovative initiative to bring mental health services to libraries and shelters.”

Lightfoot, who told Politico on May 10 that she was “excited to be a full-time mom, a full-time wife, and a full-time private citizen,” said she was thrilled to land the prestigious job.

Michelle Williams, the school's dean, celebrated Lightfoot's appointment

Michelle Williams, the school’s dean, celebrated Lightfoot’s appointment

She was a lawyer before entering politics and had an acrimonious relationship with the Chicago Teachers Union, which saw an 11-day strike and two actions during the height of the COVID pandemic.

Lightfoot has taught courses on trial advocacy at the University of Chicago and Northwestern Law Schools.

“I have always loved teaching, and the opportunity to return to it is something that excites me,” he tweeted.

“I look forward to sharing the experiences and insights I’ve learned from governing at one of the most challenging times in American history with the @HarvardChanSPH community!”

Lightfoot said his wife, Amy, and their daughter will remain in Chicago while he accepts the eight-week fellowship at Harvard. Although this is a residential fellowship, Lightfoot said he hopes to travel back and forth from Chicago.

She follows in the footsteps of Bill de Blasio, the much-loathed mayor of New York, who taught at Harvard when he left office last year.

Bill de Blasio, former New York mayor, taught at Harvard after leaving office

Bill de Blasio, former New York mayor, taught at Harvard after leaving office

Lightfoot had a contentious relationship with the City Council (pictured)

Lightfoot had a contentious relationship with the City Council (pictured)

Lightfoot had a troubled relationship with the press: Newsmax pugilistic reporter William Kelly is seen in February 2022 having his microphone snatched away

Lightfoot had a troubled relationship with the press: Newsmax pugilistic reporter William Kelly is seen in February 2022 having his microphone snatched away

His appointment to teach leadership has drawn attention.

Lightfoot’s approval ratings for office were consistently low: In January of this year, only 9 percent of Chicagoans said their city was headed in the right direction.

At the time of the first round of the election, in February, she was the only candidate who had an unfavorable rating higher than her favorable rating: a net favorable rating of -10 percent.

She did not make it to the second round.

Lightfoot immediately clashed with City Council members, leading to angry scenes. He also had a distinctly cool relationship with the governor, JB Pritzker, a fellow Democrat.

But she insisted that it was necessary.

“I came into government with a mandate of 75 percent of the vote to break the status quo and make sure that I was getting things done and putting ordinary residents of our city front and center,” he told Politico upon leaving office.

‘With that mandate, you are going to upset the status quo. You’re going to make some people angry.

He was not liked by the press: the Politico discussion was his only exit interview, defying tradition; and in 2021 he announced that he would only give interviews to journalists of color, considering the press corps too white.

She was sued over the decision, and it was convicted as a violation of the First Amendment.

Lightfoot also came under fire for a heavy hand in its COVID policies.

Thousands marched through Chicago in October 2019 during a teachers' strike

Thousands marched through Chicago in October 2019 during a teachers’ strike

Lightfoot's tenure was marked by repeated clashes with the teachers' unions.

Lightfoot’s tenure was marked by repeated clashes with the teachers’ unions.

He arranged a press conference with Police Chief David Brown and warned that those who defy the stay-at-home order would be punished. Leaving the conference venue, he saw a group of black teenagers playing basketball and told them to go home and stay there, angering progressives with his heavy hand in a struggling neighborhood.

In February 2021, it emerged that he had used $281.5 million in federal COVID-19 relief funds to cover the cost of salaries and benefits for Chicago Police Department officers, a move that further infuriated police officers. the progressives, who saw her prioritizing the police over the local population.

The police were not on his side either, despite his efforts to position himself in favor of the police.

They complained about understaffing and overwork, and she frequently clashed with the head of the police union, John Catanzara.

In May 2021, the Chicago Fraternal Order of Police cast a symbolic vote of no confidence against Lightfoot, Brown, and the department’s second-in-command, Eric Carter, for reasons including cancellations of days off and extensions of shifts.

And crime continued to rise.

During his time at the helm of the city, overall crime increased 42 percent.

Crime under Lightfoot increased 42 percent overall, in four years

Crime under Lightfoot increased 42 percent overall, in four years

Police in Chicago are seen at the scene where an officer was shot and killed on March 1.

Police in Chicago are seen at the scene where an officer was shot and killed on March 1.

In the first three months of 2023, Chicago's homicide rate of 4.2 per 100,000 made it one of the deadliest cities in the United States, worse than New York and Los Angeles, according to a WalletHub study. .

In the first three months of 2023, Chicago’s homicide rate of 4.2 per 100,000 made it one of the deadliest cities in the United States, worse than New York and Los Angeles, according to a WalletHub study. .

Under his rule, homicides increased 13 percent and shootings 10 percent.

Theft increased 30 percent and motor vehicle theft 204 percent.

Last month, researchers found that shootings with guns are so common in the city of 2.7 million that 56 percent of blacks and Hispanics are caught up in one before their 40th birthday.

In the first three months of 2023, Chicago’s homicide rate of 4.2 per 100,000 residents made it one of the deadliest cities in the United States, worse than New York and Los Angeles, according to a recent study by WalletHub.

Lightfoot’s supporters say she was chosen to shake up the status quo and she has.

They also point to economic development on the neglected South and West Sides, expansion of the city’s rail system to the South Side, promotion of a minimum wage increase, and the mobilization of $1 billion for affordable housing construction.